New 7 inch 45 from Orquesta El Macabeo - Yankee Go Home!

The latest effort by Puerto Rico’s salsa rebels Orquesta El Macabeo is a very timely cover version of the Daniel Santos anti-imperialist anthem “Yankee Go Home” appropriately coupled with the title song from their last LP, “La Maldición Colonial” on the flip side. In choosing to reinterpret “Yankee Go Home”, the original of which was released decades ago on the LP “Los Patriotas” (a joint release from Daniel “El Jefe” Santos and Pedro “Davilita” Ortiz Davila) as a daring protest song that sang “truth to power”, Orquesta El Macabeo give a fresh new take on the long, rich tradition of Puerto Rican protest music that fits in perfectly with current events on the island. The second half of the song features a spoken word section taken from the 1999 tune “Estado Colonial” from the cassette by the Boricua hardcore punk group Actitud Subversiva. As always, lead singer Luis De La Rosa inspires us with his distinctive vocal timbre and vigor, adding a sense of righteous indignation and playful critique to the urgent anti-colonial messages in the lyrics. The band, led by bassist José Ibañez and arranger/pianist Aníbal Vidal Quintero, backs Luis up with fierce and joyful playing that lends an air of celebration to an otherwise serious and heartfelt subject matter. 

The edition is a hand-numbered release, consisting of a 7-inch, 33 1/3 RPM record with two songs. Extremely limited to a Deluxe Edition version of 150 in color (red white and blue splatter, each is unique) that comes with a special 7” Orquesta El Macabeo logo DJ slip mat, and 150 normal black copies. Each record also comes with a hand-splattered postcard featuring a special photo of the band (by Joshua Espinosa and Joey Oyola) on one side and the lyrics and credits on the other. Mastered by Nestor Solomon. Released by Discos de Hoy in conjunction with Peace & Rhythm.

The band’s supply has already sold out. We at Peace & Rhythm are selling our share exclusively here on the website - hurry now as supplies are limited! The deluxe color edition is 20.00 and the black is 10.00 (plus shipping). Free extra band photo postcard (hand splattered and stamped) to the first 15 customers to purchase the Deluxe Edition. Limit 2 of each version per customer. Visit our store to purchase.

To hear "Yankee Go Home"

Check out a smokin' live version of the B-side, "La Maldición Colonial":

 

Interview between DJ Bongohead(Peace & Rhythm) and José Ibañez(bassist / leader of Orquesta El Macabeo) about the single of “Yankee Go Home”.

Bongohead:Explain a bit about how the recording was made.

José:We were looking for something cool to launch while completing the process of our double live album on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the orchestra, and it had long been considered a cover of this tune ... since we saw it as a natural fit to take it to our “Macabionic” style easily.

What was the motivation to make this record?

Well, like I said previously, and besides that we think it has a good message ... and this topic (Daniel Santos and Davilita’s protest album “Los Patriotas”) is very little known by people in general. When the album was first issued, it was very close to the time when it was forbidden to use the Puerto Rican flag in public (the cover has the flag) ... they could give you up to a 10-year jail sentence. In Puerto Rico many people sympathize with the idea, but they don't like to say it in public. The syndrome of “colonial mentality” (the colonialized).

The band has always had lyrics with socio-political content. How would you describe the role of that in your art? Whose idea was it to cover the song?

I think music is a means of expression and of transmitting messages. In our case, the message we wish to convey is one of awareness for the new generations. What better protest than the one that is perpetuated in a song? I do not remember exactly whose the idea was [to cover that particular song] but once I heard it I felt it would interesting to be performed by the orchestra at some point [the original is more in an acoustic ‘son conjunto’ style].

How did you hear about the version of the “Yankee Go Home” song and the original album where it came from (Los Patriotas / Daniel Santos - Davilita)?

A bandmate (Yussef) came and brought me a copy on CD-R ... maybe about 8 years ago. I didn't know about this album before that.

How is it relevant for the band and today's things in your country?

I think the song was released at an important time for Puerto Rico, but that was without planning [ahead of time by us]. We would never take advantage of a social or political crisis to market our music. It is very relevant because it speaks of a problem that has stalked Puerto Rico for more than 500 years, and that is [our] country being the property and prisoner of another nation. Years go by but nothing changes.

YANKEE GO HOME (Daniel Santos)

If my poor Puerto Rico

is free and associated

If my poor Puerto Rico

It is free and associated.

 

Why haven't you respected it

the way a partner is respected,

when you talk about business,

this talk of independence,

and the belief of many is

that Muñoz has been expelled.

 

Why don't you take your planes,

why don't you take your cannons,

why don't you take your thugs,

and leave here, and leave here.

 

Out Yankee Go Home, Out Yankee

Out Yankee Go Home, Out Yankee

Out Yankee Go Home, Out Yankee

Out Yankee Go Home, Out Yankee.

 

The cuchifritos(pork rinds) are from here,

sweet potato and coquí(tree frog),

Thecuchifritosare from here,

sweet potato and coquí,

Those who say “¡Ay bendito!”*,

they are from here.

 

Out Yankee Go Home, Out Yankee

Out Yankee Go Home, Out Yankee

Out Yankee Go Home, Out Yankee

Out Yankee Go Home, Out Yankee.

 

The pasteles(cakes) and the softito,**

the coquito(holiday drink) and the maví, ***

The pastelesand the softito,

the coquitoand the maví,

The mofongo(mashed plantain) and the caimito(star apple),

those are from here.

 

Out Yankee Go Home, Out Yankee

Out Yankee Go Home, Out Yankee

Out Yankee Go Home, Out Yankee

Out Yankee Go Home, Out Yankee.

 

GLOSSARY:

* “¡Ay, bendito!”

It is common for Latin Americans to facetiously call Puerto Rico “The Land of the Ay Bendito,” a commentary on the term’s popularity as well as the many nuances and eccentricities of its usage. Literally it translates as “Oh, blessed [be]!” but the expression is perhaps best understood as an all-purpose interjection or ‘holophrasis’ which resembles a lament in appearance but can in fact assume a wide range of connotations or be applied to virtually any context or mood. The term can be used to express (or be interpreted to express) pity, compassion, gratitude, concern, sarcasm, dismay, understanding, disapproval, disappointment, frustration, etc. How the term is interpreted largely depends on the inflection and intonation with which it is said. For instance, depending on the context, the inflection and the intonation with which the word is uttered, “¡Ay, Bendito!” could be translated as the following: “Dear Lord!”, “Oh, dear!”, “That's too bad, what a shame,” “That’s cute,” “That's the way things go” or “So it goes,” “I’m so happy for her,” “That was really selfless of you,” “Please, I insist!,” “She's so naive, I almost pity her,” “Damn!” or “Hot damn!”, etc.

** Sofrito

Sofrito is a sauce used as a base in Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Latin American cooking. Preparations may vary, but it typically consists of aromatic ingredients cut into small pieces and sauteed or braised in cooking oil in a frying pan or pot.

*** Maví (or mabí)

Mauby, a tree bark and sugar cane drink made in the Caribbean. The bark and/or fruit of certain species in the genus Colubrina including Colubrina elliptica (also called behuco indio) and Colubrina arborescens, a small tree native to the northern Caribbean and south Florida, is used.

VERSÍON ESPAÑOL

El último esfuerzo de los rebeldes de la salsa de Puerto Rico, Orquesta El Macabeo, es una versión de portada muy oportuna del himno antiimperialista de Daniel Santos "Yankee Go Home", junto con la canción del título de su último LP, "La Maldición Colonial". Al elegir reinterpretar "Yankee Go Home", el original del cual fue lanzado hace décadas en el LP "Los Patriotas" (un lanzamiento conjunto de Daniel "El Jefe" Santos y Pedro "Davilita" Ortiz Davila) como una atrevida canción de protesta que cantó "verdad al poder", Orquesta El Macabeo da una nueva y fresca versión de la larga y rica tradición de la música de protesta puertorriqueña que encaja perfectamente con los eventos actuales en la isla. La segunda mitad de la canción presenta una sección de ‘palabra hablada’ (spoken word) tomada del tema de 1999, “Estado Colonial”, extraído del cassette del grupo de punk hardcore boricua Actitud Subversiva. Como siempre, el cantante principal Luis De La Rosa nos inspira con su distintiva tona vocal y vigor de espíritu, agregando un sentido de indignación justa y crítica lúdica a los mensajes anticoloniales urgentes en las letras. La banda, dirigida por el bajista José Ibáñez y el arreglista / pianista Aníbal Vidal Quintero, respalda a Luis con una interpretación feroz y alegre que le da un aire de celebración a un tema serio y sincero.

La edición es un lanzamiento numerado a mano, que consta de un disco de 7 pulgadas, de 33 1/3 RPM de dos canciones. Extremadamente limitado a una versión Deluxe Edition de 150 en color (salpicaduras rojas, blancas y azules, cada una es única) que viene con una alfombrilla (DJ slip mat) especial con logotipo Orquesta El Macabeo de 7 pulgadas y 150 copias normal en negro. Cada disco también viene con una postal salpicada a mano con una foto especial de la banda (por Joshua Espinosa y Joey Oyola) en un lado y las letras y créditos en el otro. Masterizado por Néstor Salomón. Lanzado por Discos de Hoy junto con Peace & Rhythm.

El suministro de la banda ya se agotó. Nosotros en Peace & Rhythm estámos vendiendo nuestra parte exclusivamente aquí en nuestro sitio web. ¡Date prisa ahora porque los suministros son limitados! La edición deluxe en color es 20.00 y el normal en negro es 10.00 (más envío) USD. Tarjeta postal de banda extra gratis (salpicada en rojo y estampada a mano) para los primeros 15 clientes que compren la Edición Deluxe. Límite 2 de cada versión por cliente. Visite a nuestra tienda para comprar.

Entrevista entre DJ Bongohead (Peace & Rhythm) y José Ibañez (bajista/líder de Orquesta El Macabeo) sobre el sencillo de “Yankee Go Home”.

Bongohead: Explique un poco sobre cómo se realizó la grabación.

 

José: Estábamos buscando algo chévere para lanzar mientras se completa el proceso de nuestro disco doble en vivo con motivo del décimo aniversario de la orquesta, y hace tiempo se había considerado hcer un cover de este tema... ya que se visualizaba llevarlo al estilo macabiónico fácilmente.

¿Cuál fue la motivación para hacer este disco?

Pues lo que dice la respuesta anterior, y además de que nos parece que lleva un buen mensaje... y este tema es muy poco conocido por la gente en general. Cuando el tema salió, era muy cercano a la época en que estaba prohibido usar la bandera de Puerto Rico en público... podían darte hasta una condena de 10 años de cárcel. En Puerto Rico mucha gente simpatiza con la idea, pero no les gusta decirlo en público. El sindrome del colonizado. 

La banda siempre ha tenido letras con contenido sociopolítico. ¿Cómo describirías el papel de eso en tu arte?¿De quién fue la idea de cubrir la canción?

Pienso que la música es un medio de expresión y de transmitir mensajes. En nuestro caso, el mensaje que deseamos transmitir es uno de conciencia para las nuevas generaciones. ¿Que mejor protesta que la que va perpetuada en una canción? No recuerdo exactamente de quié fue la idea pero desde que la escuché me pareció interesante para ser interpretada por la orquesta en algún momento.  

¿Cómo te enteraste de la versión de la canción Yankee Go Home y el álbum original de donde viene (Los Patriotas / Daniel Santos - Davilita)?

Vino un compañero de banda (Yussef) y me trajo una copia en CD-R... hace quizás unos 8 años. No conocía yo de este disco antes de eso. 

¿Cómo es relevante para la banda y las cosas de hoy en tu país?

Pienso que la canción fue lanzada en un momento importante para Puerto Rico, sin planificar. Nosotros jamás aprovecharíamos una crisis social o política para mercadear nuestra música. Es muy relevante porque habla de un problema que ha acechado a Puerto Rico por más de 500 años, y es ser la propiedad y prisionero de otra nación. Pasan los años pero nada cambia. 

 

 

YANKEE GO HOME (Daniel Santos)

Si mi pobre Puerto Rico

es libre y es asociado,

Si mi pobre Puerto Rico

es libre y es asociado.

 

Porqué no lo ha respetado

como se respeta a un socio,

cuando se habla del negocio,

ese de la independencia,

y es de muchos la creencia

que a Muñoz lo han trasquilado.

 

Porqué no se llevan sus aviones,

porqué no se llevan sus cañones,

poqué no se llevan sus matones,

y se van de aquí, y se van de aquí.

 

Fuera yankee go home, fuera yankee

Fuera yankee go home, fuera yankee

Fuera yankee go home, fuera yankee

Fuera yankee go home, fuera yankee.

 

De aquí son los cuchifritos,

la batata y el coquí,

De aquí son los cuchifritos,

la batata y el coquí,

Los que dicen hay bendito,

esos si que son de aquí.

 

Fuera yankee go home, fuera yankee

Fuera yankee go home, fuera yankee

Fuera yankee go home, fuera yankee

Fuera yankee go home, fuera yankee.

 

Los pasteles y el sofrito,

el coquito y el maví,

Los pasteles y el sofrito,

el coquito y el maví,

El mofongo y el caimito,

esos si que son de aquí.

 

Fuera yankee go home, fuera yankee

Fuera yankee go home, fuera yankee

Fuera yankee go home, fuera yankee

Fuera yankee go home, fuera yankee.

 

 




Older Post


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published